I Thought He Came To Say Goodbye

”Ok Fred,” Rob said. “Are you trying to kill me?”

”What do you mean?” I said. “Are you playing the ‘old’ card again?”

Rob was my storeman, he was 60 years old but as strong as most 20 years old youngsters I knew. He went through a lot that bloke, just declared bankrupt, divorce dispute, and most recently health issues.

Well, to be fair, it’s not like he was taking care of his health, not with a bottle of wine every night! Sometimes I wondered how he managed to drive to the office every morning. Although it kind of explained those weird mornings where he seemed to come super early. He must have stayed the night!

Anyway, Rob was a good storeman. He was the only one who volunteered to do extra work when things went a bit quiet. He fixed the water pipe, washed the truck, and even offered to pull the weeds. He was such a humble old man.

“Fred, did you remember to order the white rags?”, I could hear Rob yelling from the warehouse.

”I did order them ..” I said, not too sure of myself.

”Well, where are they?”

”They’re not there?”

”No boss, they’re not.”

”Whatss .. ok I’ll call them now.”

Due to my million things to do I too forgot to do things. But fret not, my supplier was not far, and they were very efficient. The fact that I bought a lot from them probably contributed a little to the excellent service.

Anyhow, the white rags arrived in the afternoon (I told you they were fast). Rob looked rather excited for some reason. These rags must have grown on him. The destiny of a rags worker, sooner or later they would fall in love with those bulky rags.

The month went quickly and suddenly Christmas was just around the corner. It started to feel a lot like Christmas – it was just like the song. We had this tradition in the office to drink the day before Christmas. It wasn’t for us to get drunk or anything, or so we thought. Rob really got into it though, he bought a carton of beers for us to enjoy. Christmas present, he said. They were all for us, he said. He drank most of them, as expected.

***

”Fred, guess who got a new job?” Rob smiled at me in the morning.

”Who?” I asked.

”Me!” he replied.

And that’s how Rob broke the news of his resignation. He could not take the physical demand of the job anymore. He was getting older, and having health issues did not help either. Rob decided to get an easier job minding a hardware store near his place.

My wife and I went to visit him a few times at his new job. He looked good albeit rather bored. Well, at least he didn’t have to unload a truckload of rags there.

Rob returned the favour and came over a few times to my office. He didn’t get any younger though, and his liver problem got worse. I told him many times to stop drinking but you cannot teach an old dog a new trick.

He disappeared after a few months. His mobile was disconnected. We tried checking in at his workplace but to no avail. He vanished, God knows where.

***

”Ahh, there he is,” Rob suddenly appeared on the window.

”Whoa, look who’s here,” I said.

”Long time no see, boss,” he said to me.

”Yes, it’s been a while. How have you been?”

”Not very good, Fred.”

“What happened?”

”My liver stopped functioning, well almost,” Rob said slowly. “Doctor gave me a few months.”

”No … “ I couldn’t believe what I heard.

”It’s true,” Rob said. “I should’ve stopped .. drinking.”

”This is not happening.”

”It is, Fred.”

“Rob, what are you doing here?”

”What do you mean? I wanted to see you.”

”Yeah, I figured that out,” I said. “But why are you really here?”

”Fred, boss, I just wanted to see you.”

”I believe you, Rob,” I said. “Come, sit and I’ll make you some tea.”

We had a good long chat about work, life, family, and everything else. Rob said he missed working in the warehouse. He missed his babies, he said, referring to the bundles of rags he used to carry around.

That night I went to bed thinking I should’ve said something to Rob. Something along the line of ‘goodbye’. I didn’t because I was worried that it would offend him.

***

There was no news from Rob for the next few months. I was back to the usual hectic days at work, getting some daily physical workout in the warehouse. It was getting hot too with summer fast approaching.

”Hi, is this Fredy?” a lady called my mobile.

”Yes, it is,” I said.

”Oh .. this is Gillian, my husband Rob used to work for you.”

”Ahh yes, how is Rob doing?”

”Fred,” Gillian said slowly.

”Oh .. no .. don’t say it,” I said to her.

”He passed away, Fred,” she said. “He wanted me to tell you something.”

“Ok, I’m listening,” I said, trying to calm myself down.

“He said thank you for listening to him when he came last time,” Gillian whispered. “Thank you for not bringing up anything about him dying.”

”He also said that the last conversation gave him the peace he needed to accept his fate.” Gillian continued. “He said he felt his heart was light and he was ready.”

”Fred, Rob passed away the day after he met you.” Gillian finally said.

***

I will always remember that. That phone call. That moment.

I thought he came to say goodbye .. and I was right, but I’m glad I didn’t say anything.

Because I realised now.

He came to see me.

 

“Sometimes the best present you can give someone is to be present.”

I just want to lie down…

Forget five-star travel and the hotel life; when it comes to holidays as a soloist, Fredy Namdin prefers the simple things in life.

 

Back in the days of my corporate years, me and a colleague of mine often talked about holidays. These discussions spanned from possible holiday dates and destinations, to all the different food and drink we would enjoy during the trip.

We strategised about the best possible ways to capitalise on these holidays.Should we take it before Christmas? After New Year? Or maybe mid-year?

We took into account costs, the best weather, airlines, any special events, and so much more. It was almost an obsession for us.

I started a company more than ten years ago. Well, we acquired it but in my defence the company was in a very risky position, one bad move and there would be nothing left. We did quite a turnaround to make it into a strong and healthy business. And boy it took time to do that. I never knew acquiring a business could take so much work.

As with other businesses, things were never smooth nor stable for long. We experienced highs and lows, joy, heart break, excitement, and many other indescribable feelings.

“I just want to lie down on the sofa, relaxing, with a cup of coffee in my hand, and the most delicious Scotch Finger biscuit by my side.”

We worked so hard for the business (especially in the first few years). I remember those nights when the kids would sleep in the car because we had big orders to fulfil the following day. The worst was when the phone rang in the afternoon with an urgent request, and we knew we had no choice but to abide, because it was one of our major customers – another all nighter coming through. Who said owning a business means answering to no one? We quickly figured out that we were answering to more than 500 people (read: bosses). And these ‘bosses’ could be more demanding than our corporate bosses (not always).

Nevertheless we were happy. Things turned around and we made good money. We started to improve (increase) our spending. A new car, a new house, even a new coffee machine. Life was great.

“Hi Fred.” Eddie said to me. ”How have you been?”

“Hi Eddie, what a surprise. Well, I am doing good, man,” I said.

Eddie is a friend from my previous life. He is the one I discussed holidays with back in my corporate days.

“Where are you working now,” Eddie asked.

“I run my own company.” I replied to him. “We distribute industrial products.”

“Wow, I remember back in BankEast you always wanted to have your own business,” Eddie said.

“Yeah, it’s a dream come true.” I said, trying to remember what I really said to him back then.

“Congratulations man.”

“Thanks, what about you?”

“I work in South Bank Institute now.”

“Sounds like a good place.”

“Yes it is, and guess what, we are going to Bali again this year.”

“Again?”

“Yup, the third time this year.”

‘Third time?”

This guy is so lucky, I thought to myself. I haven’t got the time to do all these holidays this year.

“Ok Fred, I need to rush,” Eddie said. “It’s great bumping into you.”

Despite our best effort we could only take holidays during Christmas and New Year. That would be around 10 days per year. We compensate this by making it in such a way that we only work short hours during the year. Practically we structured the business around our kids. We want to spend time with them so we work short hours but somehow we end up with only 10 days break per year.

In all honesty, I never thought about it before meeting Eddie.

It’s not like we need multiple holidays anyway. Ten days break is long enough – or so I thought.

But I just couldn’t let it go. Eddie gets to take multiple trips to Bali and I am just stuck here in the warehouse? What a crappy lifestyle I have now. Surely there must be something I could do to make my life a bit better?

As I drove home I was reminiscing about the time when I too was able to take multiple trips per year. What a great life it was. I remembered the cubicle where I sat. Eddie was sitting just across my desk (hence we talked a lot to each other). The best part was in the morning when I would use the company’s coffee machine to make my delicious morning coffee. Lunch was not too bad as sometimes we had to rush things, especially when there was a big tender due.

Big tender, what a nightmare.

I must have made more than 1000 spreadsheets over the course of my career as an analyst. Oh yeah, and those headaches, splitting headaches. I was consuming pain killers like candy. I had a box or two on my desk and took two tablets per day. If I kept going the way I was maybe I could purchase them at wholesale price based on the volume I went through.

And my boss, OMG, she was the most discriminating, intimidating, back-stabbing $%&6%^.

You know what, maybe I don’t need those holidays.

Life is good as it is now.

We are happy, our business is growing, the wife is happy (very important), and I have my own coffee machine at home (also very important).

You know what, I have a great life.

It’s simple, not glamorous, albeit it’s the best for me.

I just want to lie down on the sofa, relaxing, with a cup of coffee in my hand, and the most delicious Scotch Finger biscuit by my side.

That’s all I need.

I just want to lie down.

By

— as originally appeared on Quora and FlyingSolo

My Wife Knows Everything, and So Do I

“So how much does a bundle weigh?”, Peter asked.
“20kg,” I replied.
“That is too heavy!”, he said.
“Well, your boss said the maximum weight is 25kg, so we are still under.”

Peter was a driver for a courier company that we contracted to deliver all of our products around the city. He was pretty healthy for his age, around 60 at that time. Nevertheless, he did throw a complaint or two about the weight of our parcels.

Our warehouse staff was rather young, in his 20s, so he did most of the heavy lifting. He never complained though. We were lucky to have such a compliant worker. Although sometimes I caught him checking his Facebook account at work. He did put in the hard yard, so I turned a blind eye.

In the meantime, my wife couldn’t stop complaining.

She always found something, somewhere, to criticise on. Who cared if the floor was not swept yet? Or if the rubbish bins were not emptied? We were busy making money. We did not have time for all of those little things.

We had everything under control between me and our warehouse guy, Tom. So the last thing we needed was a headache from a clean-freak wife. Don’t get me wrong. I loved her deeply. But regarding my business, there were just three people: me, myself, and I. There was no one else. I did it all.

Business was picking up. Our customers couldn’t get enough of our products. Everything was flying off the door. The warehouse was as busy as Tokyo central train station. I was contemplating whether to get new staff or not.

Well, until such time when Tom rang at 8am that morning.

“Hi Fred, I am sorry, but I need to leave by 11am today,” Tom said.
“What’s happening?” I asked.
“It’s a little bit awkward to explain,” he replied.
“Alright, that’s fine,” I said. “I am coming shortly anyway.”

I had butterflies in my stomach. Something was not right.

The following day Tom came to work. He worked hard as usual. Peter, the courier driver, threw some complaints again about the weight of the parcels.

“Hah, weak little old man,” I thought to myself. “I could lift those parcels easily.”

***

My coffee was too hot that morning. I was just holding my cup in the warehouse, waiting for Tom to arrive. He was unusually late that day.

“Tom, you are finally here,” I said to him as he came through the door.
“Ah, yes, I am here,” he seemed somewhat flustered.
“Ready for work?” I asked.
“Umm, before that.”
“Yes?”
“I have something for you,” Tom handed me an envelope. “This is my resignation letter.”

And that’s how I finally knew where Tom went a few weeks ago when he had to leave at 11am. He went to an interview at another company.

***

I didn’t have the time to get a new staff straight away. So for the following few weeks, I worked extra hours in the warehouse. It was like an exercise anyway, I said to myself, trying to justify it.

Peter still said the same thing about our parcels, that they were too heavy. Of course, I didn’t pay any attention to it. If he couldn’t lift them, I would do it for him. And so I did, loading all the parcels from our trolley to his truck.

My body started to feel the pain from lifting all of those heavy parcels. In particular my back. I guess I wasn’t as strong as I wanted to be. There were times when my back froze in the morning. It stiffened up like a block of ice.

“Maybe Peter is right about the way we handle these parcels,” I thought to myself.

We did interview few people to replace Tom, but we didn’t feel right about any of them. It was not an easy job, what Tom was doing. I wanted to make sure we got the right person.

In the meantime, I kept plodding along.

The back pain got worse. It was a regular thing to get a stiff back in the morning. I couldn’t care less though, we had work to do.

“Hi Peter,” I said.
“Fred, you are here again,” Peter said.
“Yeah, we haven’t found a new warehouse guy.”
“O well, at least you’re still young.”
“Well, not really, but I can lift these up for you.”

And as soon as I picked up the last parcel, I felt a knife jabbed in my back.

I felt on my knees. I could still feel the knife. The sharp pain shot deeper into my middle back. By then I felt my back almost collapsed. I couldn’t move, I couldn’t speak.

Peter closed his truck door not realising what happened. He drove away, leaving me on the warehouse floor.

I waited for a few minutes before trying to stand up. I felt a sharp pain every time I tried to move. I finally pulled myself up. I walked towards my office holding on to everything I could find.

“Hunny, I think I hurt my back,” I called my wife.
“What do you mean you hurt your back?” my wife replied.
“I was lifting this parcel, and I felt severe pain in my back.”
“What? Are you ok?” she started to panic.
“Not really, I could hardly walk.”
“Ok, don’t move, I’m coming now.”

***

My wife took me to a Physiotherapy.

It was a disc-injury.

The gel in-between my spinal bones was pressed so hard that it was swollen and hurting the nerves around it.

The Physiotherapist said it would take at least a few weeks before I could start working again. And he specifically told me not to do any heavy-lifting. He said if it happened again the damage could be permanent.

I couldn’t believe it. I lost a good employee. Then I lost my back. I lost everything.

“I could help in the warehouse,” my wife suddenly said.
“You?”, I said in disbelief.
“Yeah, I can lift those parcels too.”
“They are too heavy.”
“I’ll figure out a way.”

My wife ended up helping around in the warehouse for the next few weeks. I was recovering slowly while she worked hard. And she did figure out a better way to lift the parcels. She used the forklift. I never knew why we did not think of it before. I felt stupid trying to handle all those parcels by hand.

A forklift, of course!

So basically, she packed the goods and then put them on a pallet. Sometimes she used two pallets when the day was busy. She would then used a forklift to raise the pallets so Peter could just push them onto his truck easily. What a great idea! I have to say, she was a better warehouse worker than the previous guy.

You know what, all her complaints about floor and bins. It meant nothing now. She was the one that held me up when I needed help the most. She was the one that came to the rescue when there was no one else. And she was the one that put up with me and my massive ego.

I never knew how weak I was. I never knew how much I needed someone to support me when I got myself in trouble.

I thought I could do it all.

I couldn’t.

I realised that in this business journey of mine, I don’t have to go it alone. In fact, I cannot go it alone.

I need support.

I needed it then, and I still do now.

***

“While good support is essential, during difficult times, it is non-negotiable.”

The Cavalry From Above

“So remember son, stick with your business for as long as possible. Because in business, boom and bust come in waves. This is not something you can control. If you stick around long enough, eventually, you will get your golden era. You just need to be ready when it hits you.”

That was what my dad said to me around 12 years ago. He had been in business for more than 30 years, so I thought it was great advice. Until of course I came to my senses and realised being an entrepreneur is all about being able to control my own destiny. I mean who has time to wait for this ‘golden era’? He was in business for decades, and we still lived in a modest 3 bedrooms house. Surely he would have come across his ‘golden era’ already?

***

Back in 2009, we were importing rags from a Canadian company. It was high-quality rags where the raw materials were collected from local charities around the country. They were not the cheapest, but we had been dealing with them for years, and they were always professional and reliable. Other suppliers tried to get our business, albeit we were never interested. We were one of the most prominent rags dealers in our state back then. We were small, but we were fierce.

There was a guy, Paul, who came few times to purchase our rags. He was an importer too, but he never said much about it to us. Mind due, his primary business was not in import. He told us about his plan though, going to Pakistan and India to search for new suppliers.

The Canadian company that we dealt with only worked in US dollars. Which meant being an Australian company we had to be careful with the currency exchange. Few percents off could mean few thousand dollars loss. I even established a foreign exchange account with a local financial institution to improve my overall exchange rate.

The strategy was to purchase US dollar when AUD dollar was stronger and put it into the forex account. At one time we accumulated more US dollar in the forex account than our own business account.

You can see how risky this currency exchange stuff was.

We managed the business pretty well. It started from one container every three months, then every two months, and in 2009 it was one container per month. We had a few of them on order at any one time. All because it took approximately two months from the time we put the order in until we received them in Perth.

I said to my wife that we were selling rags like peanuts. They just flew off the door. Looking at the way we were growing, we would reach our first ever $1 million sales that year, all from rags alone.

But of course, fantastic results did not come without its own risk.

You see, I never thought it would come to that. I prepared everything, trying to control every little area of my business. I had enough US dollar in our forex account to purchase two containers. Never did I know that AUD dollar would decide to plunge itself against US dollar and stayed at the bottom, for a long time.

But it happened. AUD dollar fell from a high 97c to a US dollar to a mere 61c in only a few short weeks.

We used up all of our US dollars to purchase two containers. And then things got worse because AUD dollar dropped even further to 50c. We did not have any choice but to pay the next order based on the weak AUD dollar. We tried to increase our price, but at that rate, unless we raised the price by 80-100%, we were still at a loss. An increase that much would only give our competitors an incredible window of opportunity to steal our customers.

The market would react, and the price would correct itself but not until another few months at least. We didn’t have the luxury of time. Our modest price increase was nothing compared to the profit we lost to the weak AUD dollar. We were running out of cash, very very quickly.

We lost at least twenty thousand dollars per container at that time. And we had a few of them on order. At the end of the day, we decided to cancel everything unless they were already on the sea. As a result, unless we started to purchase from our competitor, within one month, we would have nothing to sell. Our $1 million sales target were reduced to $0 within five months of AUD collapse.

***

I was sitting in my office trying to get my head around this dire situation. I could not believe only five months ago we were doing so well. Now we just had a little bit of stock left, maybe enough for few weeks.

I tried to think my way out of this, but my brain just couldn’t get into gear. I called everyone I knew to get advice from. Unfortunately, AUD dollar did not collapse against US dollar very often. In fact, it was one of the rare moments that it happened, and even more unusual because it stayed at the bottom for an extended period of time. It almost like AUD dollar found its happy place at the bottom.

One of the guys that I called said he never saw this happened before and this guy was a furniture importer for ten years before he became a pastor. I felt somewhat unlucky after that conversation.

My closest friend reckoned I should update my resume because the end was near. We didn’t talk much to one another after that.

And then I realised. This was beyond me.

This was out of my control.

OMG, my dad was right. Boom and bust came in waves. I was never in control. All these time I was just lucky.

The time finally came for me to face the worst in my journey as a businessman.

***

“Fred,” Paul suddenly appeared through my office door.
“Hi Paul,” I waved to him.
“How’re things mate?”
“Good,” I said, trying to hide my apparent stress.
“Remember I told you about sourcing rags from Pakistan?”
“Yes.”
“I did. I went there and had dinner with rags suppliers.”
“Wow, that was great.”
“Yes, one of them decided to make me their sole distributor for Perth.”
“Sounds like a great deal.”
“Which is why I am here now,” Paul sounded a bit nervous. “Well, are you interested in getting rags from me?”
“What sort of price are we talking about Paul?”
“Look, I know I am new with all these, but the quality is very high you wouldn’t believe it,” Paul replied.
“Yes, but at what price?” I was getting impatient.

And I swear to you if I could record the next five minutes conversation I would play it every day until such time that it was time for me to meet my creator.

“Fred, the price is excellent,” Paul smiled.

And it was. The price that Paul said was 20% less than the cost of rags we paid to the Canadian company when AUD dollar was strong. I couldn’t believe my luck. Paul appeared just at the right time with the right product, and the right price (better even).

There must be something or someone up there helping me out.

I was screaming in my head: “Look, if there is an intelligent higher being up there, thank you, thank you, thank you. Although next time, please don’t wait until the very last moment before sending the cavalry. A slightly faster help would be great.”

Our business was saved from disaster. Paul had been an excellent supplier. He was always ready to help. His company grew multiple times afterwards. I guess AUD dollar collapse meant he could sweep struggling rags dealers like me within a short few months. Now that I think about it again, it was a brilliant move by him. Well, I couldn’t complain. He did save my company.

And for us, we are back on track.

I am done trying to control everything. I know I have to be ready for incoming boom and bust. But deep inside my heart, I know someone is looking after me.

Somehow, I thought about you, dad.

 

 

I Was Blind, But Now I See

You know that feeling when you could not do the simplest thing in the world like putting the correct address? Well, guess what, we had three returns this week, all due to the same mistake: wrong address. The worst thing was, of course, it was all my fault.

I didn’t normally do this. It was not in my nature to make mistakes.

They used to call me ‘the machine’ back in Dog Swamp Distribution. I was so good even my supervisor started to doubt himself.

There was something wrong somewhere. I knew I needed to fix it. We could not afford customers missing their goods all the time because of my stupid mistakes.

“Hello?” I answered the phone.
“Hi, is this Fred’s Industrial Supplies?” the voice from the other end said.
“Yes, hi John,” I replied, recognising the voice straight away.
“Fred, how have you been?” he said.

John didn’t normally say “how have you been”, so something was wrong (again), must be my lucky day.

“Look, we have just decided,” John said.
“Decided .. yes?” I said nervously.
“O look, I feel bad, honestly, but we have decided to use another supplier,” John finally said. “I felt like I had to tell you directly.”

My senses were frozen. I wanted to say something but all I could gather in my head was silence. It was cold, dark, and just silent. I felt nauseous. I felt sick.

John was my biggest customer. His company contributed about 30% of our revenue. His departure was a major shock to me. Well, to be honest, it was not like he didn’t give us any warning. He had been telling us how we should review our pricing. I didn’t think it was that serious. I guess I was wrong. But I couldn’t be wrong, I knew what our competitors were selling at and we matched them, we matched everything.

“John, are you serious?” I said. “Can we talk about it?”
“We have talked about it, Fred,” John said. “You just didn’t listen.”

I was disappointed and angry. That was the moment when I decided that I couldn’t rely on my existing customers. I had to do something. These ungrateful people just kept disappointing me. I gave them the best services ever, the best prices, and the best of everything. And still, they went behind my back and left for useless competitors.

I kept myself composed and said my final words to John.

“Alright John, I get it. Well, let me know if you change your mind then.”

I made a commitment to myself that I would work harder than ever to get better customers. I would not let this incident destroy me. It was time for me to shine. At least that was what I had in mind.

I spent the following months trying everything I could think of to promote our products. I did land new customers. Some of them were pretty good customers too. I knew I could do it. There was nothing stopping me now.

But still, none of them was as good as John. These customers were ‘smallish’. They were like insects, while John was like a whale.

I tried harder. I went around door knocking. I called up potential customers for meetings. I mailed hundreds of sales materials. I faxed promos to everyone I knew would be interested. I did everything I could think of. I landed few more customers, but they were all ‘smallish’. All of them combined were still nothing compared to John’s purchases.

And in the meantime since John’s departure, we sank deeper into financial trouble. Losing 30% of revenue was not an easy matter. I cut cost everywhere I could think of. We even started to turn off the air conditioning during the day to save electricity. We let go everyone except Sam our loyal delivery driver. He agreed to take a pay cut to help us a little bit.

We were desperate. We were on the brink of bankruptcy.

There were times when I didn’t want to go to sleep because I knew I would wake up in the morning to face my nightmare all over again.

I would drive to work contemplating whether I should keep driving or going back home.

“Fred, this is Sam,” Sam my driver called me.
“Yes, Sam?” I said.
“I’m so sorry, I know you don’t want to hear this,” he said.
“What is it?” I said. My heart started to beat faster.
“I have been in an accident,” Sam replied. “I am ok but the van was damaged, badly.”

I felt the cold again, this time I could feel it creeping into my bones. I felt like a dark cloud was hovering around me. I could not say anything. I was just staring at the traffic.

“Fred, I am so sorry,” Sam said. “I will help to pay for the damages. I know things haven’t been easy for you.”

I didn’t say anything. Sam hung up the phone. It wasn’t his fault but he felt guilty nevertheless. He did end up paying for the insurance excess though. He resigned immediately afterwards.

We were out of whack for few weeks while the van was fixed. I ended up using our family car for delivery. We were lucky because we had a big family car. So we managed to fit quite a good volume of items into it.

My wife joined forces to mind the phone while I went around doing deliveries. She was very good with the phone. It was in her nature to build conversations. I had to say, I never knew she was that good.

Due to my activities with delivery, I got to meet with a lot of our existing customers. I didn’t use to talk to them because I was too busy trying to get new customers. This gave me refreshed perspectives.

My customers never said it but I could see they appreciated my efforts to stay afloat. Some of them even offered me cold drinks on hot days. I began to build great relationships with them. I never knew they were such a good bunch of people. I always thought of them as ‘smallish’ customers that I couldn’t care less. Boy, I was wrong. I was so wrong.

I guess there were a lot of things I didn’t know about them.

I began to really care for them, walking the extra miles when they needed help. There were times when I would do express delivery within the hour if I knew they needed the goods urgently. Some other time I would drop my prices heavily because I knew they also had difficulties with their own businesses. I thought it was important if we could weather the storm together.

My customers started to support me more. They gave me more business and they referred me to their friends. I could not thank them enough for their generosity.

John never came back to us, but we survived.

I looked at myself differently now. I thought I was so good that I could never make mistakes. Well, I did, a lot of them. I just didn’t realise it. I thought I was above my customers. In reality, I was beneath them. They were the ones who supported me during tough times.

They were the ones who gave me a second chance.

When that phone rang a few months ago, I was devastated. I couldn’t believe how unlucky I was. I was wrong. It turned out to be the luckiest day of my life. It was the day my life was about to change. What I thought was the lowest point in my life turned out to be the highest point.

I went through hell to see heaven.

But it was worth it.

I was blind, but now I see.

 

 

 

Finding Fire

For mere mortals life is nothing but a short passage way. Massive global collection of information only shorten the memories of those who went before us. In this short time we have on earth we speed through life almost like it is not worth our time to live it.

Or maybe we are too afraid to live our lives differently. We are afraid of what people would think. Maybe we have let others to live our lives for us.

At the end of our lives what would be our biggest regrets?

What is it that we couldn’t forgive ourselves should we fail to accomplish it?

What are we here for?

The fire that used to burn inside, maybe we should find it again. It was the moment when time stood still, when we disappeared, absorbed into ourselves. It was the moment when we knew what we were supposed to do.

It is too late, some might say.

It is never too late.

The fire that burns is worth a lifetime of searching – even if it only burns for a while. A lifetime of coldness turns into a breath of warmth, and then you’d know that you’ve done what you should be doing all this time.

What does your heart tell you?

What keeps you awake at night?

What give you goosebumps like you are on top of the world?

What is your fire?

Maybe we could stop our busy lives and ponder for a while.

Maybe life is worth our precious time on earth to live it the way it should be lived.

 

“You are never too old to set another goal, or to dream a new dream.” C.S. Lewis

The Call of a Busted Region

In the past few years Australia has faced one of its darkest moment in economy. The ten years mining boom busted leaving trails of destructions along its previously glorious paths. Businesses succumbed to the crisis, closing their doors, loosing millions in the process. The trickle down effects continued for years affecting even those mom and pop businesses around the corner.

Gloom and doom is the mood.

Unemployment is on the verge of a dangerous level. Government is scrambling to control its finance, trying to off-load some of them onto the tax payers. The strengths of dominance from large conglomerates keep the cost of living at unsustainably high level.

Has the long search for wealth completed its journey? Is there anything left to find? It is a moment of despair, yet opportunities are abound for those lucky enough to have left-over resources. Those with resources are feeding on the battlefield. The wounded and dying have given up. The rich gets richer and the poor gets poorer.

The lucky country is not so lucky anymore.

Should we give up?

Do we have the strengths to carry on?

These questions mark the beginning of another journey. It is through adversity a person grows stronger as those who tried to kill him has failed. The survival alone is enough testimony to the strengths required to carry on.

It is only at the bottom of the pit that we have the moment to find the strengths to carry on.

While opportunities have dried up for most people, those who survive are sitting in a pool of hidden gems. The dust has not settled yet but the smell of money is permeating the air. The call of money is echoed through the regions. Those who are brave enough will stand up and dust off their gears.

They are ready for the next challenge.

They are ready to answer the call from a busted region not yet finish with its blessings.