The Gates Are Closed

“So if we purchase 40 cartons, you can give us 15% discount?” I asked John, the sales rep.
“Yes, that’s right,” John said.
“Can you write the quote on paper, John?”
“Sure,” he said, writing it on his business card. Which seemed a bit informal to me, but John looked confident, so maybe it was common practice.

It was a good day when our supplier decided to give us a massive discount. We had been talking to a customer about a bulk purchase of rubber gloves. They were happy with our services, so it was just a matter of prices.

We were confident we could win the contract. And off we went to negotiate, armed with great discounts from our beloved supplier.

We got the deal. That’s the good news.

The bad news was, John, didn’t honour the agreement. A quote written on the business card was not good enough for him to acknowledge. John said it was out of his hand. He said something about top management didn’t want the smaller distributor to wreck the market.

We couldn’t get the products at the prices promised to us.

It was a massive blow.

A good day turned into bad weeks, and then months.

In the meantime, our customer got the products from someone else. At least they seemed happy. We still had a good relationship, so hope was not lost yet.

There was only one other supplier in our state that distributed this particular product. They did not bother to return our call though, such rudeness and arrogance. We figured out in the end that they were the one who secretly supplied those rubber gloves through another distributor.

No worries, maybe not our luck. Our lucky break would come eventually.

***

“Fred, this is John,” a voice from the other end said.
“Hi John, how have you been?” I said, wondering what he wanted this time.
“Look, I know we haven’t been good to you,” he said.
“Ok.”
“But I’ve been talking to top management.”
“Yes, I’m listening.”
“And we all agreed to support you.”
“Regarding?”
“You know, the rubber gloves, the one we quoted last time.”
“Oh you mean the unofficial, dishonoured, quote? Is that the one?”
“Yes, that’s the one.”
“Why the change of heart?”
“There’s been a change in strategy, and they want to work with smaller distributors now.”
“I see.”
“So, are you in?”
“I’ll think about it.”

My mind was full of all past rage and disappointment. The time when John dishonoured the quote was still fresh. And the time when our $2,000 profit went down the drain. It left a unique mark because I was looking to use the money as a deposit for a new family car. We didn’t end up purchasing the car of course.

I spoke to my wife about it. We had our usual kitchen bench board meeting.

She said we should be more careful this time. I agreed to it, considering how bad they burnt us last time. We decided to accept the offer, provided they put it on formal company letterhead. In addition to that, but we also demanded better pricing for initial stocks.

John honoured the quote this time.

We talked to our customer and got a new deal with them to supply the rubber gloves. They put in their bulk order, and then another one, and another one. It was like a dream come true. We never thought things would work out well eventually.

Interestingly, we didn’t end up purchasing a new family car. We just felt the time was not right yet. Maybe past trauma was still too fresh.

We did feel that our luck had turned though.

***

“Andrew, can you talk to Tyres West?” I asked our sales rep.
“Sure, what do you want me to talk to them about?” Andrew replied.
“Well, they owed us $12,000, and it’s overdue for more than 60 days now.”
“Ok, that doesn’t sound too good, have you called them?”
“Yes, of course, and the answer was always the same: we are going to pay soon.”
“That sounds a bit worrying.”
“Can you go tomorrow?”
“Yes.”

Tyres West was the customer who purchased those rubber gloves from us. They were usually very good with payment. The past few months, however, were a bit worrying. I had hope that things would be ok though.

The following day, Andrew went to visit Tyres West to talk about the debt.

“Fred, you would not believe it,” he said.
“What?” I replied.
“The gates are closed.”
“What do you mean?”
“I mean, the gates are closed, in Tyres West.”
“What?”
“There is no one here.”
“What, are you sure?”
“Yes, very sure, I even jumped the fence.”
“You what?”
“The warehouse is empty, no equipment, nothing.”
“What …”

Tyres West closed down. No one knew what happened. The day before I was just on a call with their accounts lady. She even expected Andrew to come and discuss the debt.

We figured out later on that Tyres West closed down overnight. And even more surprising was that we read on paper about how the company had ties with the bikie gangs. It seemed like they were not as clean as they looked.

We lost a lot of money.

What an unlucky day.

***

At home, we had another emergency kitchen bench meeting. We wrote down our expenses and tried to figure out how severe the damage was. It was bad. We were glad that we didn’t purchase that family car. Let’s say, someone up there restrained us from putting that deposit.

Our kitchen meeting concluded with us slashing certain expenses. So no more eating outs and end of year holiday was downgraded from Bali to free activities in the city. We were confident we could ride this storm.

My mind went back to the day when John dishonoured his quote. I was so furious that I sent a formal complaint to his boss. That complaint seemed to go to a deaf ear though.

It seemed such an unlucky day. But now that I thought about it again, maybe it wasn’t so unlucky at all.

Perhaps it was our real lucky day.

We didn’t realise it yet.

 

“It’s amazing how you can look back at your life and feel like you’re the luckiest and the unluckiest person in the world at the same time.”

A Night To Remember

It was 2am, and our newborn daughter decided to wake her parents up. My reflex told me to elbow my lovely wife. Fortunately (or unfortunately) she was asleep, and my conscience said it was a big no. Do not disturb a mother in a deep sleep, or else.

What should I do? Maybe I could try to calm her down. I remember my wife always did this whispering thingy. I might try that. What if it doesn’t work?

Arrghh…the struggle is real.

In the meantime, the little baby got impatient and cranked up her cry. I swear I heard the neighbour’s dog got up and started barking.

“Shuuussshhhh….” I whispered to her. I held her tight and rocked her gently.

It seemed to work.

Half an hour was all I needed. My little girl was fast asleep then. Yes, success, well-done daddy.

“Hunny, was she crying?” my wife suddenly woke up.
“Umm yes, but she’s asleep now, all good,” I said.
“Ok, thank you for that.”
“Go back to sleep, everything is under control.”

It was February 2008 and we only just acquired a business. Coming from the corporate background, we had no idea how to run a small business. The only thing we knew was a job description and how to fake sick leave. We learnt quickly that these two didn’t seem to exist in small business.

Our first child was born just before we acquired the business. It was what we like to call: “Miracles Do Happen, Twice”.

It was a dream.

We were starting a family and somehow came across a great business. It felt good, so we bought it. It was like one of those Nike commercials. We would .. just do it.

We were unstoppable.

Our lack of experience in small business did not deter us from jumping into this new journey of self-employment. We realised later on that the very reason it did not, was because we had no idea what we got ourselves into. We got into business blind-folded.

And guess what, we got into parenthood blind-folded too.

The first time I realised this was when I dragged the cot from the office to the back room, with my daughter in it, crying. The reason, was only because I couldn’t talk on the phone.

And also because it finally got to me. The stress, lack of sleep, burnout, and a million other things we never thought possible.

There were times when we would stay back in the warehouse until dinner, had dinner, and went back to work. The little girl would sleep in the cot like a small angel. This was the time when living in the warehouse seemed like a good idea. I am glad we never did.

We tried to learn fast about everything business. The worst was never-ending-day-to-day administrative duties. Who knew something that seemed so simple and mundane like this could give us a headache? Never underestimate the requirement for small business regarding data entry, filing, stock taking, tracking order, monthly report, and so on, and so on.

Did we bite off more then we could chew?

***

“Hi Fred, I need ten boxes of milk, five tins of coffees, and ten packs of sugar,” my customer put an order.
“Yes, no problem at all,” I said.
“When can we get them?”
“Tomorrow,” I replied.

Another late night I thought to myself.

“O no, I forgot to prepare the bags for bread factory,” I just remembered. There were twenty bags to prepare. I needed few hours to do that.

“Are we ready to go?” my wife asked.
“No, we are not,” I said. “We have to go and get the supplies, and I need to prepare bags for the bread factory.”
“But that will take few hours at least.”
“Yes, I know,” I replied. “Look, why don’t we get the supplies, go home, and then I could come back to the warehouse to finish the twenty bags.”
“But you would be working until morning.”
“We have no choice, I don’t want her to sleep in the warehouse again, she is already on antibiotics.”

Our little angel was not feeling well that night. The doctor prescribed her with mild antibiotics, but she still needed a good rest.

We went home, had light dinner, and off I went back to the warehouse. It was 9pm then. I knew I would not get home until around 2am. O well, we’ve got to do what we’ve got to do. Back in university days, we used to stay up until 4am and was fine for the 8am lecture. This was nothing.

But I guess knowing our child was sick put a little bit of pressure as well. I wanted to be home with her. Gosh, parenthood was stretching me thin. Things worked differently when we had a little baby at home.

It was dark when I got there. I looked around to make sure the street was safe before opening the gate.

It felt weird working alone at night. Sometimes I heard voices from behind the shelves. It must be all of those scary movies coming back to haunt me.

Well, the first few bags didn’t take long to finish. I felt my muscles tensing up a little bit, and suddenly my lower back screamed in agony. I must have pulled a muscle there.

I decided to rest for few minutes and turn off the machine. And somehow that voice came back from behind the shelves.

“Ok, mental note, do not watch scary movies anymore,” I was talking to myself.

I went back to work. My lower back was hurting but nothing I couldn’t handle. It was probably just the old disc-injury playing up. I only had to persevere, and it would be over soon.

The rest of the bags took a lot slower than I hoped for. The back pain worsen. I couldn’t stand straight this time. At least it was almost done now. Just two more bags to go. It was 1.30am. Suddenly, my phone rang (from behind the shelves).

“Hunny, are you still there?” my wife asked.
“Yup, only two more bags to go,” I said. “What’s up?”
“She’s burning up.”
“How bad is it?”
“Very, I think I need to go to the hospital.”
“What, are you sure?”
“Yes.”
“Can you wait for me? I just need to finish the last two.”
“No, I need to go now.”
“Ok, I am so sorry hunny.”
“It’s alright. It’s what we do.”

I couldn’t believe it. Could it be any worse? Excruciating back pain, working alone at night, and now my wife had to drive to the hospital alone.

I continued on to finish the last two bags. My mind was filled with all sort of scenarios. What if something happens? What if the doctor says? What ifs… The worst thing was, of course, there was nothing I could do except to keep working to get it done. And I finally finished all of the bags. It was one very long night.

I closed the gate and rushed to the hospital.

My wife was waiting in the hospital room. She smiled and gave me a hug.

“It’s ok, she’s fine,” she whispered.

***

Time went on, our little girl recovered from her illness, and we were back at work as usual. While still suffering from lack of sleep we were getting better at managing it.

But that night, that was a night to remember.

***

“No one looks back on their life and remembers the nights they got plenty of sleep.”